HMS Revenge bombards Cherbourg

One of the 4.7 inch guns on board HMS JUPITER firing on the night of the 10 - 11 October 1940, when heavy and light forces of the Royal Navy carried out a bombardment of the enemy occupied port of Cherbourg, where a concentration of enemy shipping had been detected.

One of the 4.7 inch guns on board HMS JUPITER firing on the night of the 10 – 11 October 1940, when heavy and light forces of the Royal Navy carried out a bombardment of the enemy occupied port of Cherbourg, where a concentration of enemy shipping had been detected.

What the deck looks like from aloft. The view from the Range Finder Control platform perched high above decks.

What the deck looks like from aloft. The view from the Range Finder Control platform perched high above decks.

These sailors are on the coldest spot on a battleship; the range finder control tower high above the deck of HMS REVENGE. The men at this station are the guiding eyes of the guns.

These sailors are on the coldest spot on a battleship; the range finder control tower high above the deck of HMS REVENGE. The men at this station are the guiding eyes of the guns.

The threat of invasion was now rapidly diminishing but the program of bombing the channel ports from which an attack might be launched continued. The targets were the barges that the Germans had commandeered from around Europe to use as landing craft, and the naval ships that would support them. Unknown to the British Hitler had finally decided to “postpone’

A bombardment from 15 inch guns of the World War 1 Battleship HMS Revenge augmented a bombing raid by the RAF on the night of 10th-11th October.

A force consisting of H.M.S. Revenge, cruisers, destroyers and motor torpedo boats, working in conjunction with heavy bombers of the Royal Air Force, bombarded the port of Cherbourg on the night of the l0th-llth October.

The co-ordination of the attack was excellent, the lighting of fires in the target area and the illumination of Cape de la Hague by flares for fixing purposes occurring at exactly the right moment. One hundred and twenty rounds of 15 inch and 800 rounds of 4.7 inch shell were fired and very heavy fires were started. It would appear that the shore defences at first mistook the bombardment for part of the air attack as the only response to shells falling was a marked intensification of anti-aircraft fire, including flaming onions and multi-coloured tracers of all descriptions.

After the bombardment had ceased a battery of heavy guns (estimated up to 13-15inch) to the east of the town opened fire. Salvoes fell close to the ships for a period of 30 minutes and up to a range of about 36,000 yards. The fire was so accurate that it was thought that some form of R.D.F. was used for ranging. No casualties or damage were sustained by H.M. Ships.

The ship's Chaplain conducting the morning Service under the shadow of the 15 inch guns.

The ship’s Chaplain conducting the morning Service under the shadow of the 15 inch guns.

Physical Training on the quarterdeck being done to the music of the Royal Marine Band.

Physical Training on the quarterdeck being done to the music of the Royal Marine Band.

There is no lack of drill precision as the men fall in preparatory to landing for field exercises.

There is no lack of drill precision as the men fall in preparatory to landing for field exercises.

The 4" High Angle Anti-Aircraft Gun crew in action.

The 4″ High Angle Anti-Aircraft Gun crew in action.

A 6 inch Gun Crew under instruction on board a battleship.

A 6 inch Gun Crew under instruction on board a battleship.

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