Nazi lie ensures Jewish co-operation

Jews selected for 'deportation' make their way to the railway station in the Lodz ghetto. They carry with them all their worldly goods because they have been told that they will be 'resettled' in labour camps or farms. The Nazis have never been specific about the details and nothing has been heard from those who have already left.

The Jewish community in the Lodz ghetto was keeping its own chronicle of the daily events and their treatment by the Germans. In January deportations of around a 1000 people a day had begun. There had been no word from any of the deported so far, so news, even from a German source, of what had happened to them was seized upon:

On April 12, a high officer of the secret police [Gestapo], who is serving as the commander of the camp where the people deported from this ghetto are now located, was briefly at Balut Market. This is the first definite source of information concerning the deportees; for the record, it is worth adding that the story of their whereabouts that circulated with the most persistence has, this time, been confirmed.

It has now been irrefutably established that the camp is located in the region bordering directly on the town of Kolo, now called Warthbrucken. The camp houses about 100,000 Jews, indicating that besides the 44,000 resettled from this ghetto, Jews from other cities have been concentrated in that camp. This gigantic camp was formerly a living site for Germans from Volhynia, Apparently 30,000 people had been living there. They left the barracks in perfectly decent order, and even left their furniture for the Jews to use.

The food supply at the camp is, apparently, exemplary. Those fit to work are employed on the camp grounds repairing roads and performing agricultural tasks.
Workshops are to be set up in the very near future?

See The Chronicle of the Lodz Ghetto, 1941-44.

In fact it was a all a complete lie, designed to facilitate the conduct of the deportations with as little trouble as possible. So far in 1942 over 44,000 people had been deported – see Lodz statistics – and every single one of them had made the 60km railway trip to Chelmno and been gassed the next day, bar the very few who were needed in the work groups to bury the dead.

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