The convoys get through

The gun crew of destroyer HMS VIVIEN with shells of the type with which they plastered the enemy during an attack on a British convoy on the 11 November 1940.

The gun crew of destroyer HMS VIVIEN with shells of the type with which they plastered the enemy during an attack on a British convoy on the 11 November 1940.

The Royal Navy was at full stretch escorting convoys in addition to all its other commitments.

The Battle of the Atlantic was causing Churchill more concern than any other issue but the week before Christmas proved to be a good one, somehow the U-boats which had caused such devastation only weeks before had been eluded.

During the week ending noon Wednesday, the 25th December, 785 ships, including 145 allied and 16 neutral, were convoyed, but no ships were reported lost. Two battleships, two aircraft carriers, three cruisers, ten armed merchant cruisers, 55 destroyers, 13 sloops and 29 corvettes were employed in escort duties.

Since the beginning of the war 207 ships including 23 allied and 16 neutral, have been lost out of 48,066, including 5,255 allied and 4,237 neutral, which have been convoyed, or one in 232.

Merchant ships under convoy guarded by the ever watchful destroyers

Merchant ships under convoy guarded by the ever watchful destroyers

On board the battleship HMS Rodney at sea. 1940. View of the convoy from a porthole of the battleship. A pom-pom is seen being cleaned on the left.

On board the battleship HMS Rodney at sea. 1940. View of the convoy from a porthole of the battleship. A pom-pom is seen being cleaned on the left.

At sea in a destroyer. 1940, on board the British destroyer HMS JAVELIN. A normal deck scene during the morning at sea. Activity on the starboard side as the destroyer returns from seeing a convoy safe.

At sea in a destroyer. 1940, on board the British destroyer HMS JAVELIN. A normal deck scene during the morning at sea. Activity on the starboard side as the destroyer returns from seeing a convoy safe.

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