1942

Sep

5

1942

Japanese defeated at Milne Bay

5th September 42: Japanese defeated at Milne Bay

He returned to his section for more grenades and again advanced and silenced the second post. Armed with a Thomson submachine-gun, he then attacked the third post, firing from the hip as he went forward. He was seen to be badly hit by the fire from this post, but he continued to advance.

Sep

4

1942

Nazis order that children be ‘deported’

4th September 42: Nazis order that children be ‘deported’

Well, we – that is, I and my closest associates – thought first not about “How many will perish?” but “How many is it possible to save?” And we reached the conclusion that, however hard it would be for us, we should take the implementation of this order into our own hands.

Sep

3

1942

Coastal Command strike again

3rd September 42: Coastal Command strike again

On board a Whitley VII of No 502 Squadron during an anti-submarine patrol, August 1942. In the cramped cockpit the skipper consults with his navigator while the second pilot flies the aircraft.

Sep

2

1942

Japanese threaten British POWs in Singapore

2nd September 42: Japanese threaten British POWs in Singapore

Outside of the crammed barracks in the parade ground there was very little cover for the men and we baked in the sun. Our officers warned us that we would face a court martial if we signed and that the japanese were breaching the Geneva Convention that allows prisoners the right to attempt to escape without facing punishment. The japanese could not have cared less about the Geneva Convention and had no intention of observing it.

Sep

1

1942

Rommel gets bogged down

1st September 1942: Rommel gets bogged down

What most of us weren’t aware of, was that false maps of the area had been allowed to fall into enemy hands which indicated certain routes between the Qattara Depression and the two ridges as being ‘safe’, whilst others were dangerous, meaning soft and treacherous sandy going.

Aug

31

1942

Panzers halted at Battle of Alam Halfa

31st August 42: Panzers halted at Battle of Alam Halfa

There were estimated to be three and a half thousand tanks, troop carriers, armoured cars and transport vehicles spread out in the cauldron below. Forty enemy tanks had dug in immediately below us and were pounding the top of the ridge and another hundred enemy tanks were mustering to the north between the New Zealand Division and ourselves.

Aug

30

1942

Rommel’s last throw of the dice

30th August 1942: Rommel’s last throw of the dice

Shortly after passing the eastern boundary of our own minefields, our troops came up against an extremely strong and hitherto unsuspected British mine belt, which was stubbornly defended. Under intensely heavy artillery fire, the sappers and infantry eventually succeeded in clearing lanes through the British barrier, although at the cost of very heavy casualties and a great deal of time…

Aug

29

1942

Victoria Cross won on the Kokoda Track

29th August 42: Victoria Cross won on the Kokoda Track

He rushed forward firing his Bren Gun from the hip through terrific machine-gun fire and succeeded in clearing a path through the enemy. Continuing to sweep the enemy positions with his fire and inflicting an extremely high number of casualties on them

Aug

28

1942

‘Nuisance raid’ on Bristol kills 44

28th August 42: ‘Nuisance raid’ on Bristol kills 44

When I walked past the three buses, I heard the sound of a single-engine aircraft far above in the clear blue sky — it was a lovely summer’s day then. It never crossed my mind that it was an enemy plane; it had been eighteen months since the last major German air-raid on Bristol. Yet the lone raider was from the Luftwaffe; maybe returning from a raid in the North with one bomb left, which he decided to jettison before homing to his base airfield.

Aug

27

1942

India prepares for battle

27th August 42: India prepares for battle

I told the doctor attending them that, whatever was or was not the matter with them now, I relied on him to see that they really did feel ill within the next couple of hours. What dismal drench he administered I do not know, but, pale and shaken, they were on parade next morning. When I asked how they felt and inquired whether they would not like to see the doctor again, they assured me most earnestly that they were in no further need of medical attention.