Guestbook

This page is intended for general comments about World War II Today. Observations, corrections or appeals for information about specific events are probably best left with the individual entries.

I am certainly no ‘expert’ on the War, this blog is a process of exploration and learning for me. This is very much a generalist site covering as wide a perspective as possible. So I am always happy to signpost to places where people can learn more. Quite a few people have left encouraging comments but I am equally open to feedback of just about any kind – although as a general guide I have yet to approve any comment that has been signed off “Heil Hitler” or similar. Suggestions about material to cover, particularly from first hand memoirs or contemporary records, are always welcome.

Thanks for your support

Martin Cherrett

{ 126 comments… read them below or add one }

Julie Burke April 10, 2014 at 5:23 am

Great photos of ack ack girls – I now know what my Mother,Hilda Westmorland, did in the war Thanks

Tara Wesolowski March 25, 2014 at 1:54 pm

This is a great blog! I really enjoyed reading the articles and looking at the pictures you have posted! My grandma and grandpa served in World War II so I feel greatly connected.

Q March 16, 2014 at 11:40 am

How soon the invasion comes upon us! All too often D Day is seen in isolation. Excellent coverage, I hate to mention Spike Milligan again but today reading your account of Montys speech to the troops (he also did great work touring factories and doing speeches in canteens), but he too mentions the magic and excitement of just catching a glimpse of the General in North Africa.

Andrew Shakespeare March 5, 2014 at 6:44 pm

Been following your blog for some months now. Absolutely fantastic. Your coverage of Stalingrad (which I read a year late) in particular, was gripping and strongly conveyed the awful impotence of the German forces following the Russian masterstroke.

Matt March 5, 2014 at 8:47 am

Thanks for the great site, I have linked to it from my site.

Must be a lot of work to update and keep this site going, keep it up!

Matt

Daren February 27, 2014 at 2:31 am

We all need to have the past recounted to us. Thanks for this awesome blog!

P Schumaker February 20, 2014 at 4:11 pm

I think this is an incredible idea for a blog. While so many blogs are about celebrities or tracking current trends, it’s historically centered blogs like this that really catch my attention. I love the idea of posting each day like it was a day in World War II, letting people who follow it experience the war in the news as if it was happening today. It puts us in the actual perspective of a civilian during that time- we today can summarize everything that happened in the war quickly, but to people back then, their news of the war came through articles like the ones you post, and it came slowly. Thank you for making a blog like this possible.

Q February 5, 2014 at 10:04 pm

Excellent pictures and coverage of the often ignored Italian front. I believe the gun being used by the New Zealanders in todays article is infact a captured German PAK 42 75mm anti tank gun. In any event it shows the problems of getting direct fire onto the high targets. I think Spike Milligans book covers this with a 5.5 Howitzer balanced on ammo boxes to attack a German observation post.

Sharon Davis February 4, 2014 at 11:04 am

This is an astonishing project, thank you so much for all your effort!

s.J.Tagliareni January 31, 2014 at 6:04 pm

Thank you for posting such a splendid website.I had the good fortune of studying with Dr. Viktor Frankl and these postings are most valuable to remind us of that horrible period.
Thank you again,
S.J.Tagliareni
author of Hitler’s Priest

Alfonso M January 5, 2014 at 6:50 am

I’ve only just discovered this website and I must say that I’m quite impressed with this project.
Thank you for the resources you provide herein and keep up the great work.

Editor December 24, 2013 at 12:15 pm

Merry Christmas Q.

Que December 24, 2013 at 9:29 am

Whats wrong with signing off Seig Heil ? Thats biased against fascists! Even the Daily Mail has a picture of the lovely Mr Hitler most days.

Tracy November 12, 2013 at 4:21 pm

I have only just found this site.

I now know, through one of the personal accounts, something more about the day that my aunt, Lily Vernon, sadly lost her life on the 28th August 1942.

She was a civilian on one of the buses hit by the daylight raid in Broad Weir, Bristol.

Her name is shown on a Memorial Plaque but unfortunately I have currently been unable to find where she was buried. I sadly do know,however, that there were mass burials.

If anyone has any information it would be much appreciated.

Michael Unger November 10, 2013 at 10:55 pm

So glad to have found this and equally as grateful for your effort. This is an amazing endeavor that is educational, informative, and necessary. Thank you.

tammyCA October 31, 2013 at 7:07 pm

Just discovered this blog today and glad to have found it. I have always had an interest in WWII history and that era, but only in the last few months has it become almost an obsession to read everything I can find about the war (most often it is the personal memoirs & stories I am drawn to..oh, and watching the Military channel has educated me, but I love to read anything related). My dad served in WWII in the Navy overseas and my mom worked at the war plane building factory during that time.
Admittedly, it is difficult to not become teary-eyed reading about the sad losses of innocent lives but it is important to remember and share this history..to always have gratitude and respect for those who sacrificed.
Thank you for your blog! :)

Matthew Ketcham October 24, 2013 at 1:17 pm

Wonderful! THANK YOU TO EACH AND EVERY MAN AND WOMAN WHO MAKE (MADE) MY WORLD A BETTER PLACE TO LIVE!!!! The real hero’s of ww2 were the men and women who DID NOT come home (NO DISRESPECT TO ALL OF THE MEN AND WOMEN WHO SURVIVED) PLEASE NO NO NO DISRESPECT MEANT!!!!!
THANK YOU AND ALL YOUR FAMILIES FROM OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR TIL TODAY. THANK YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF MY HEART!!!!

Q October 10, 2013 at 9:40 pm

The Tiger at Horseguards is the one you covered in Tunisia…

You can see this same Tiger tank today at Bovington Tank Museum..

Zelda Becht October 3, 2013 at 10:41 pm

My husband was in World War II. He was wounded in Sicily. 1943.
Last year, 2012, we took his ashes to Arlington National Cemetery, where he was laid to rest. A l00% disabled veteran for all these years, he managed to support a family, and do everything he could to enjoy his years here. He was 91 when he died. While he was overseas, I did what most of the woman who stayed at home did, left a regular job and went to work in a shipyard, welding the ships the boys needed. I was Zelda the welder. We loved our country, and I would like it the way it was, great and proud, again.

Bob Sherwood October 1, 2013 at 11:57 am

Excellent web-site. I am half way through a MA in Holocaust Studies and this site has been invaluable.

I am fortunate that I know the creator who, contrary to what he says, is an expert on the war and has a great deal to offer in advice, knowledge and expertise

Keep it going and hope you receive the rewards you deserve for such a project

Angelica Nelson September 28, 2013 at 2:03 pm

Best blog I’ve seen, maybe ever. My family has a story that stayed with me that I wish I could remember the date, but I can estimate that it was the summer of ’44. My mother was a baby in a carriage, my aunt about 10, and they were escaping Cluj, Romania from an advance by either Germans or Russians, I’m not sure. My grandmother remembers vividly that they’d received a messge the night before that the city would be bombed, and they packed up and by dawn, the bombing had begun.. too early. They had to run from it. They say my mother slept through all the running and explosions and panic! We are ethnically Hungarian, so they kept running back to Hungary whenever the border seemed to be moving. At the end of the war, they were in Arad, and our family centered around Timisoara and Arad from that time forward. Recently, I saw some youtube videos showing ethnic Hungarians in Romania enjoying festivals together with Romanians and speaking Hungarian on Romanian TV. It was a beautiful sight. God bless us all.

Baker Mike Romeo September 8, 2013 at 9:06 pm

I have only recently discovered this blog, thanks to a link from another, but it is just wonderful – I look forward every morning to getting a little piece of history and some fascinating images when I get a break from work and have time to check my RSS reader. Please, keep up the excellent work!

Janine September 5, 2013 at 3:51 pm

Thank you so much for including the link to William Shirer’s Berlin Diary on your post about the first time Berlin was bombed. I cannot wait to read it! I just started researching this period in detail and I can’t think of a better source. I am re-telling my mother’s story about her life in Berlin during and after WWII. It’s at

http://www.memoriesofwartorngermany.wordpress.com.

I love reading your daily blog posts for each day of the war – as it happened. What a fantastic idea. I’m sure it’s a huge undertaking! Lot’s of people must enjoy it. Thank you for taking the time.

Gustav September 2, 2013 at 4:18 pm

I must say, an excellent and truly ambitious blog! Keep up the good work!
Gustav

javier paterna August 21, 2013 at 8:49 pm

querido martin descubri esta pagina hace un año aproximadamente y la sigo sin perderme ningún dia de la guerra. gacias por publicar esta pagina y el momento mas esperado para mi es el dia 6 de junio de 1944,,,espero que haga un tratamiento especial ya que fue un evento importantísimo en la wwii. gracias por este inmenso trabajo que realiza.

David August 13, 2013 at 2:07 pm

Hi,
This is truly the most detailed website I have ever seen on War World II.
I was searching for memorials for our site (ITQuacks.com) and found this, It looks amazing and professional. wow!!!
Keep up the excellent work,
David

Editor August 11, 2013 at 7:15 pm
Subhasish Baruah August 10, 2013 at 5:11 pm

Thanks for this lovely blog!

ARASIN STAUBLY August 8, 2013 at 10:33 am

“Built from the original daily mission reports filed by the crews that flew the missions, the Theater History of Operations Reports (THOR) database allows an unprecedented look at how airpower has been used over the last 100 years.”

Air Force Research Institute (AFRI) Phone: 334-953-2213

Jacob George August 8, 2013 at 4:03 am

Great website/blog. However, I have noticed that there is nothing on the fall of Singapore, and event that was a big slap in the face for the British and the ANZACs, no to mention the Indians (and their side issue of independence – through those who supported Chandra Bose).

Jack August 7, 2013 at 4:55 am

Martin, just a quick note of thanks and commendation for providing us such a varied window into the war. Your primary sources and photos are captivating. I am using your site to teach my high school students how to do proper historical research while examining the POV of sources, looking for possible bias. I realize how exhausting your work must be, but it is greatly appreciated.

Tony Duiv August 3, 2013 at 6:38 pm

One of the best ww2 sites I really like your detailled information what happened on each day,best part for me are the personal diaries who give the war and the unknown soldier a face. Many thanks for making this great blog

Patrick July 31, 2013 at 2:52 pm

Great blog tracking day by day history. Fascinating individual stories.

Here’s a great research resource – the WWII info/video library is vast and offers relevant books.

http://www.mediander.com/connects/519489/eastern-front-%28world-war-ii%29/

Wéry Arnaud July 23, 2013 at 6:08 pm

Hello,

I’m a Belgian journalist and with my team we talking about little known archives on the WW2 in our special web page with map.

Perhaps you will be interested

Arnaud

In 2005, the archives of considerable value were (re) discovered. They relate to compensation for damage to private property that occurred during the Second World War. With 900,000 records, this is a gold mine that has been updated. These records made immediately at the end of the conflict, are primary documents with a priceless historical value. There are photos, postcards, descriptions of key events in the towns and villages, but also plans, official documents … Here, no faulty memory, the stories are clear and precise as it … Ensure that the file is as complete as possible. With sometimes also exaggerations on the amounts.
Since late 2012, the drafting of the Future Huy-Waremme began a long process of research to discover unknown stories and documents about our cities and villages.

http://www.lavenir.net/extra/dommages-de-guerre

Editor July 6, 2013 at 8:28 pm

John

Many thanks for your support. It really was a long war, as I occasionally ruefully reflect. Good luck with your Kickstarter project.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1510631719/wwii-pilots-now-and-then-photos-and-their-stories

best regards

Martin

John Bradley July 5, 2013 at 9:00 pm

Dear Martin
I have been following your site every day for what seems like some years now – I have no idea how long – but I just want to say thank you for providing such interesting material. I find it fascinating.
All the best and keep up the good work.
With many thanks.
John

Editor June 22, 2013 at 12:16 pm

Paul

Many thanks for getting in touch. I see that I covered a Nazi massacre in 1941 so that probably would not be much fun.

I covered UXBs in 1940

http://ww2today.com/21st-october-1940-unexploded-bombs-cause-widespread-disruption

There were dozens of UXBs around the country at this time as the country got used to the first month or so of the blitz. I am sure an ARP theme with perhaps some ticking time bombs, bomb shelters under tables, sirens, tin hats and people shouting “put that light out” etc would make for an entertaining evening as well as reminding people what was going on. The air raid menace never completely went away almost throughout the war.

Hopefully other readers with have some other ideas

best regards

Martin

Paul Larkin June 22, 2013 at 5:21 am

Dear Martin,

Not sure if you can help with this request, My daughter Hannah (17) set up a Charity called Butterfly Giving to help teenagers suffering with cancer. Each year one of our intensions is to host an annual event to commemorate a particular time in History as well as making it a fundraising night, last year we did Bugsy Malone from the 30s which was brilliant, this year we are doing WWII Allied Night from the 1940s. Is it possible that your good self or anyone who views your website could help with any information of exactly what happened on the 20th October 1939 to 1945.
Also any information on table center pieces for that time period and room decorations would also be very helpful

Q June 21, 2013 at 6:23 am

An interesting note to your story of 20 June 1943. The Tiger Tank being inspected by HM King George VI is the very same Tiger 131 recovered by Major Bruce Lidderdale and recounted in the book Catch That Tiger (Noel Botham and Bruce Montague), I think you may have covered the story earlier. At any rate the Tiger was displayed at Horse Guards after various adventures, and now has been restored to running condition, and can be seen in the best collection of Tanks in the world at Bovington Tank Museum in Dorset. (And Monty’s Humber staff car can be seen with his Command vehicles at the Imperial War Museum site in Duxford).

(www.duxford.iwm.org.uk)

(www.tankmuseum.org)

Editor June 16, 2013 at 7:44 pm

Hugh

Thank you for your comment.

I do not think Leo Marks comments were based on ‘tittle tattle’. If you read ‘Between Silk and Cyanide’ you will see he devotes a chapter to describing his extended briefing with Noor Inayat Khan. He was very obviously full of admiration for her resourcefulness and determination. Nevertheless there was most definitely an issue with her difficulty in telling any untruth. Marks describes how he developed a strategy just for her, to help her work around it ‘in extremis’.

I don’t think any of this detracts from recognising the heroism and bravery of Inayat Khan. If anything I think it helps us understand a little more what a remarkable person she was, being so highly principled that she still took on this role, fully recognising the risks involved.

It is easy to find out more about Noor Inayat Khan, for readers that wish to do so. This website will be remembering her again, later in the war.

Martin

Hugh Davie June 16, 2013 at 7:07 am

http://ww2today.com/16th-june-1943-soe-agent-noor-inayat-khan-arrives-by-moonlight-in-france

Re Noor Inayat Khan
I find this post extraordinarily insulting to the memory of one of SOE’s bravest agents. As a source Leo Marks has always been known for gossip and tittle tattle and a frequent guest in documentaries to promote himself and his career as a screenwriter and author.

May I refer you to the Noor Inayat Khan Wikipedia entry …

Editor May 20, 2013 at 8:06 am

http://ww2today.com/17th-may-1943-speer-assesses-the-damage-done-by-the-dambusters

You make a very valid point. Far too many people have been taken in by Speer’s claims that he was able to keep the German war machine going despite all the bombing. The whole Nazi system was built on lies – and the leading figures were all past masters at manipulating the evidence so that they could get the approval that they all sought from the Fuhrer.

The sources that I use on this site are presented ‘as is’ – they are just what the people said at that particular time. I hope that they are all interesting in their own right. Nevertheless the historical value of any one of them has to be carefully assessed in the context of when and why they were written.

Q May 20, 2013 at 6:51 am

Interesting reading Albert Speers assessment of the British Dambusters raid. Having read his detailed memoir, written whilst serving his Nuremberg sentence (served to the very last second), I must say the man ‘who knew nothing’ does show a tendency for a rather selective memory. An honest presentation of an historic document that shows I think how he wrote to his friend (friendship apparently based on a mutual love of architecture) and put a toady spin on things. Drafts of his memoirs and the final published presentation to the world show an edited, selective and ‘creative’ tendency with an eye to his audience.

Without doubt the divergence of massive resources away from building the Atlantic wall, and the V weapons programme makes the Dambusters raid worth the sacrifice and effort alone.

FRANCISCO JAVIER PATERNA April 26, 2013 at 9:34 pm

ESTA ES UNA GRAN PAGINA DONDE SE PUEDE APRENDER MUCHO Y CONOCER LAS EXPERIENCIAS DE MUCHAS PERSONAS QUE SUFRIERON DURANTE LA GUERRA.

CONGRATULATIONS. GOD JOB MISTER MARTIN

Chloe Irwin April 21, 2013 at 3:13 pm

Just found the site today as I need help with an essay on the Belfast Blitz. I think this won’t be my last visit to the site, well done!

jimmy paget-brown April 18, 2013 at 8:08 am

Dear Martin, I have been following your website for some time, and find it utterly fascinating. Congrats.
I was 7 when the war started, living in a London suburb, so have vivid first-hand recollections of the Blitz. My 3 elder brothers were all in the Forces during the war, and all survived.
My novel “Finn’s War” follows the fortunes of one English family from Day 1 until the war’s end You might enjoy reading it. It has been written under my pen name of James Brown.

Editor April 12, 2013 at 8:38 am

Adam

Many thanks for adding that extra bit of information to WW2Today. It is very striking to learn that those events are not a matter of history but continued to affect people’s lives for a long time, and still do.

I appreciate hearing these personal connections to the stories, and I know that many other people do too.

How old was your father Charles Gill at the time of the bombing?

Martin

Angela Lodge April 10, 2013 at 3:25 pm

My Dear Dad George Smith was Chief Petty Officer with Captain Donald Macintyre on HMS Walker and was on The Walker the night they captured Otto Kretschner .. I am desperate to find out any information regarding being able to claim his Arctic Convoy Medal .. my Dad died 31 years ago and would have been 100 this June had he lived ..

I would love to hear from anyone who was also on HMS Walker .. if they are still with us..

Thank you in anticipation
Angela Lodge nee Smith

Adam Gill April 9, 2013 at 10:52 pm

Relating to the article 1st May 1940 first casualties WWII. Fredrick and Dorothy Gill where my grand-parents. My father Charles William Alfred Gill was in the house at the same time as his parents they were upstairs he was downstairs.

The limited family history on the event was that he was injured and after the explosion went back into what was left of the house to see if he could rescue his parents, but nothing was left, as the film footage verifies.

It is only recently I have discovered your information and newsreel on the incident. The family knew that dads parents died in the early part of ww2 and in Clacton, and that he was in the house and injured at the time but very little else. He did not wish to discuss the details of the events at any length.

All their belongings were destroyed by the bomb. So even to this day and through all my Dads life since the event, there have been no mementos, sentimental items, or pictures so I have no idea what my grandparents looked like .

Dad only had his memories which He mainly kept to himself, although I think scared, he didn’t let this affect our upbringing but saddened him later in life. He died in 2005….

Adam Gill

Editor March 28, 2013 at 8:27 pm

Peter

Sorry to disturb your morning like that, just got my scheduling all wrong.

It is always encouraging to get such feedback and good to know that there a is regular readership.

And it does help keep me going sometimes – it was rather a long a war!

Rest assured it is my intention to keep going to the end.

Martin

Peter McGrath March 28, 2013 at 12:00 pm

OMG – panic here in Orlando, Florida, this A.M. as I opened my computer to see no entry for 28 March 1943 !

Hope all is well, Mr. Cherrett as your site is near and dear to my heart.

Cheers to the war resuming sometime soon.

Sincerely -

Peter

Anton Verberne March 19, 2013 at 12:35 pm

The amount of rare articles and pictures on this site is amazing. I just keep on reading. Please keep on doing what you do, it is much appreciated!

Editor March 18, 2013 at 11:41 am

Tornike
Many thanks for asking. See my email to you.
Martin

Editor March 18, 2013 at 11:38 am

Steve, many thanks.

Steve Freeland March 17, 2013 at 11:45 pm

I thought that you would be interested in this article about a Valentine tank found in Poland last year. There’s also a video on youtube of this event.

Also, You saw the article about the P40 found in the egyptian desert, yes?

Hope all’s well.

Still enjoying your efforts – well done.

http://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/valentine-tank-from-world-war-ii-found-in-polish-warta-river.html

Yours,

Steve

Tornike Khomeriki March 16, 2013 at 7:04 pm

Hello,

First of all, I would like to thank you for maintaining and developing such a great website with its distinctive purpose and extremely engaging stories. I have been researching the WW II topic for ten years now, and I need to say ww2today is a remarkable source of information for me.

For exactly this reason, I would like to inquire if I could have a right from you to translate selected occasional articles from ww2today into Georgian and publish them on a Georgian-language WW II blog (http://stormnthunder.wordpress.com) I recently started. Obviously that includes posting the link to the original post, as well as a note on translation.

Thanks in advance.

Gavin McGregor February 26, 2013 at 10:04 am

Great website! Reading it has become part of my daily routine.

finn January 30, 2013 at 4:43 pm

Thanks for making this website it helped me with my homework

Mark Savage January 30, 2013 at 2:56 am

This is easily one of the very best historical sites for learning about World War 2. It humanizes that terrible conflict without editorializing.

Obviously, with the passage of time, veterans and survivors are starting to slip away. And so our view of the conflict is becoming increasingly muddied. This site then should be a mandatory component of any history curriculum attempting to teach our young people about the war.

My compliments on a superb visual layout, effective links to more information, and content that is compelling.

Best regards,

Mark Savage

damy January 28, 2013 at 10:43 am

if eastern front did not open Germany shud won war but when Hitler attack USSR hi open 2 front and send tanks to fight east so El-Almein left not fully redy to fight british force.

Holley Petersson January 24, 2013 at 6:39 pm

Fascinated by all things World War II and your blog is fantastic – I check it every day on my lunch break. The combination of a brief story, with photographs, journal entries, quotes, etc., and also the clean and effective site design, make the WWI Today blog continually interesting and readable. Thanks for putting in all the work!

Q January 19, 2013 at 4:31 pm

At last we reach the turning point of the war!! Some say Stalingrad, or El Alamein….but without doubt the Royal Artillery won the war pretty much on its own, and the Germans never stood a chance once Gunner Spike Milligan was let slip! Glorious to read his diary amongst those of Mouchette, and Clostermann among others, it shows the two fingered salute from the forces across the Empire the and good humour in adversity that so baffled the Nazi high command. Against the language of Shakespeare they were hamstrung by a language only suited to marching songs and ranted orders.

Editor January 18, 2013 at 10:42 am

Thanks for the feedback Damy, that’s useful. Unfortunately when the site is “translated” into a mobile version it loses some of its functionality and look. I am looking at other ways to run the mobile version. For the moment here is KV1 story …

http://ww2today.com/23rd-june-1941-the-germans-encounter-the-kv1

Loren Johnson January 17, 2013 at 10:30 pm

What a wonderful website for WWII enthusiasts. This world-wide event is recent enough to engage all current generations (the greatest ((who participated)), baby boomers, current, etc.) with more indepth research/leisure reading opportunities because of the advent of internet and the opening of previously closed archives now available to the public. Presently, how lucky we are to explore any facet of war to any degree imaginable because of the web and sites like yours.
Thank you for your efforts.

Loren Johnson

damy January 17, 2013 at 9:27 pm

yes but i cant use it at phone
i can put in anything like kv1 but i cant do serch i need somthing like go key

Editor January 16, 2013 at 8:35 pm

Damy

Thanks for your comment. The Wordpress search engine, found on the front page, is very strict if you did not spell exactly correctly – Barbarossa was covered in a number of entries from June 1941 and does come up in the search engine for me.

http://ww2today.com/22nd-june-1941-barbarossa-the-invasion-of-russia-begins

I am working on some other ways of finding past material, guided tours etc – but at the moment getting the daily blog takes priority.

regards

Martin

damy January 16, 2013 at 8:12 pm

I like this site and read it every day. But when I wish to find some things like Operation Barbarosa I need to go all to all the months, as I dont know which one is it – so can you put some search engine?

Editor December 21, 2012 at 4:07 pm

Mike

Glad you like the site. The Battle of the Bulge is generally acknowledged to have started on 16th December 1944 and so my current best estimate to start covering it is on ….. 16th December 2014.

To be fair if you are following on a mobile device the dates of the stories may not always appear correctly like they do when viewing on a computer – so it may not be obvious that all my stories appear 70 years after the event. I try to do this to the exact day if it is possible (but see FAQ for exceptions). I am trying to find out a way to sort the mobile dating issue – mobile devices seem to insert the date of posting by default, so 1942 always appears as 2012.

Hope you’ll still be following with us in 1944/2014.

best regards

Martin

Mike Paternostro December 21, 2012 at 2:52 pm

Great site and I read it everyday. When will you detail the chronology and post pictures for the Battle of the Bulge? Thanks for having this available to us. Great way to start the day!

Editor December 20, 2012 at 4:00 pm

Barry

Absolutely. I found a little known gem when I discovered his book. Very amusing as well.

Glad you like the site.

Barry N. Miller December 20, 2012 at 3:03 pm

Martin,
Fantastic website. Look at it everyday at the office. Today, you covered some of the escapades of Major Denis Forman. I hope you will cover some more of his career especially when Lt Col Forman tries to control Major Lionel Wigram and his Wigforce (Italian partisans – one was my cousin) in the hills of Abruzzo, Italy when you get to posting events for Dec 1943 – Feb 1944.

Editor December 18, 2012 at 9:18 am

I think the issue is that ‘video’, strictly speaking, refers to magnetic tape or digital media, not celluloid cine film which was all that was available during the war. On the other hand many people refer to video as any time of motion picture, not distinguishing the method by which it was originally recorded.

Bill Grundy December 18, 2012 at 12:28 am

Not sure what Luc below means about no video footage of WW2 or slaughter of Jews. Suggest he looks here: http://youtu.be/-tGwjwK9pIM

Editor December 17, 2012 at 2:59 pm

Hi Luc

I believe you refer to:

http://ww2today.com/15th-december-1941-the-skede-beach-massacre-of-the-jews-of-liepaja-latvia

I really meant video in the sense of motion picture but I take your point and have changed the entry.

Many thanks

Martin

Luc Dewez December 17, 2012 at 12:11 pm

Great job but don’t forget there was NO video during WWII.
So noboby was ever able to shot a video of any slaughter of Jews or anything because video was something that came much more later (late seventies).
I know it’s a detail but words are very important for us who try to keep History alive.
Keep on the good job.
Luc

damy December 14, 2012 at 4:20 pm

ok thns for answer and i will be at site every day :D

Editor December 13, 2012 at 4:23 pm

The reason is that we are still in 1942 … and they haven’t happened yet!

Glad you like the site

Martin

damy December 13, 2012 at 2:58 pm

i love WWII history and this is best site so far :D
but i not like this thing there is no battle of Kursk and operation Bagration

Editor November 19, 2012 at 12:55 pm

See my email reply

Ellen DAVIES November 15, 2012 at 2:50 pm

My partner has written a book “Farewell to Hamburg” Giving the reader some idea of life for a young boy in war stricken Hamburg and then his journey to a strange country – Wales and his life as “the enemy” .

Editor November 9, 2012 at 4:58 pm

Leopoldo

Thanks for your feedback. You make a fair point – I am always interested in hearing from anyone who can recommend a memoir, whether published or online from any nationality, particularly those whose story from WWII is not widely known.

This blog started out mainly as British WWII research project and it will always have that bias because that was the core of my research. With half the war to go I will continue to try to bring in as many perspectives as possible. But even if an event may be regarded as “important” it may be very difficult to find someone who had written a personal account about some aspect of it, so if I have to make a choice (and with so many things going on in so many different theatres from now on there is often a need to make a choice) I will tend to go with the best story.

Hope this explains things a bit. Suggestions always welcome.

Martin

Leopoldo November 9, 2012 at 1:05 pm

This blog is fantastic, and gives a clear idea of what was happening during the most cruel time in history of mankind. The first accounts always gives us a very specific perspective of the times these men and women were living.

I would love to see postings in a broader and wider variety, and not only too focused from the “british” point of view… there has been some days that very important events occurred in World War II have been ommited from the blog for a note that seems no so relevant only to reflect the “home front” at Great Britain. Could it be possile to give the reader various points of view from the different sides that were involved in this brutal conflict?

Please don’t misunderstand me, this is a great blog still and the research job is simply delightful and magnificent!

stan November 2, 2012 at 4:01 pm

Interesting take. Monty showed patience and skill in building reserves and morale for this battle.

Editor October 29, 2012 at 3:32 pm

Great family story – though rather less great for your grandfather! Thanks for adding this.

Mike October 28, 2012 at 5:22 pm

I have a connection with your entry for 1st May 1940 – the first civilian casualities of the war in Clacton on Sea. My late mother’s family lived 350 yards away from the crash site in Holland Road, and her father was one of the first ARP wardens to arrive on the scene and took the full blast of one of the bombs (there is a report in The Daily Sketch for 2nd May 1940 including a photograph of my mother and her father, but I have only ever seen a poor photocopy my mother obtained some years ago).
My grandfather was made deaf by the force of the explosion, though temporary (a few months) he suffered with hearing problems for the rest of his life. My mother and her brother were at the scene later on and the mistaking of a bomb for a hot water cylinder is part of my family’s history – my uncle sat astride the ‘cylinder’ and was moved on when it was realised it was a bomb!

roger October 27, 2012 at 8:33 pm

What an interesting site. a good blend of personal stories and the wider picture. We have to learn from the past, and ww2 was surely a horrendous time to live through.
Thanks for taking the trouble to run the site.

Editor October 16, 2012 at 7:50 pm

Good to know you are still with us.

WW1 did cross my mind … but I probably ought to read something completely unrelated to war, novels or something, for a bit.

Hugh Davie October 16, 2012 at 3:23 pm

Well done Martin, still enjoying the blog everyday.
Only 23 months to go before the start of the Great War….any chance you could do another site for World War 1? There is only one years overlap (Aug 1914-Aug 1915 or Aug1944-Aug 1945).
Have a think about it.

Stephan Harrison October 13, 2012 at 9:39 am

Can I just say that this blog is a remarkable piece of work. You have done a fantastic job in bringing to light a record of WW2. I and several of my friends and colleagues read this every day and comment on it. Very many congratulations.

Nuno Fonseca October 11, 2012 at 9:02 pm

Just want to say Thank You! Thank for all the work you’ve been doing in the last months, gathering information and photos to put online a website like this!

Thank you!
Nuno

T Alan Hammer September 5, 2012 at 4:15 pm

Been checking out your blog quite a bit as I finish up my first novel (set right before WW2). You have done a great job, and I wanted to thank you for your help in grounding myself each day before I get started. Keep it up!

Angela Allen August 29, 2012 at 1:02 am

Hi
For someone who did an open university course called Total war and social change with the Open University and now trying to write about both wars as seen through the eyes of my family generations and how it affected them, this site has been fantastic. My grandmother left me a huge legacy of her rich memories and i have been doing lots of research but you have life so much easier. The pictures, the comments, the information is so invaluable and so well presented. Well done and keep it up. It should be on every history teachers – since the 2nd world war is the GCSE syllabus in schools for history – bookmark page for sources and resources to use within the classroom to get some of the kids of today to understand the context and suffering of the war.
Please keep it up
Angela

George August 25, 2012 at 7:31 pm

Hi. Great site/blog. It’s a shame that you haven’t recognised my home town of Derry/Londonderry, as this small city played a pivotal role in the naval operations during the second great war.

Lucio Caramori August 25, 2012 at 6:56 pm

What a wonderful job. I can’t stop reading the posts.
Keep up this amazing and important work.
Cheers from Brazil.
l.

Veronica Hammond August 17, 2012 at 12:05 am

My grandfather was one of the troopers killed on 21st November 1941 at Sidi Rezegh.
I was looking for information about him, but with no luck !

Carlos Guerreiro August 5, 2012 at 8:30 pm

Great work you are doing. Altough Portugal – my country – was neutral I have colected some stories related with WWII around here. You can find them in a site and in a blog… I leave you with the links.

If there is some help I can give you, please let me know…

http://www.landinportugal.org/
http://www.landinportugal.blogspot.com/

Christopher Phillips July 19, 2012 at 9:01 am

What an amazing WEBSITE.. Well done…

Lawrence Millington May 22, 2012 at 9:46 am

Just wanted to add my thanks and appreciation for this excellent site.
Please keep up the great work!

Ronny Herman de Jong May 17, 2012 at 6:23 pm

Hi Martin,
What a fantastic blog you have. So many diverse stories give a more and more accurate overview of the war in all theaters.

Because most of the entries are written from a military point of view, I thought you might be interested in a historical account of the plight of civilians under Japanese oppression in the – then – Dutch East Indies, now Indonesia.

I am the author of a historical memoir partially based on my mother’s camp journal about the years we spent in Japanese death camps for women and children on the island of Java in Indonesia. We barely survived, but here I am to tell the world about it!

My book: Rising from the Shadow of the Sun: A Story of Love, Survival and Joy
ISBN 978-60910-753-6
Publisher: Booklocker.com

You may want to peruse my website for more information and also look at readers’ reviews on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.

Hoping to hear from you at your earliest convenience, I thank you for your time.

Ronny Herman de Jong
http://www.ronnyhermandejong.com/books/
ronnyhermandejong@gmail.com

Editor May 14, 2012 at 9:50 am

A rather neglected campaign in the war. Captain Partridge was one of the pioneers of dive-bombing by carrier based planes, he had a narrow escape in Norway on 27th April 1940.

Henrik MJoman May 13, 2012 at 10:25 pm

Absolutely fascinating story told on Captain Partridge’s & Lieutenant Bostock’s ordeal in Norway – I am glad they came out alive. Henrik Mjoman, ex-Royal Swedish Navy, RIGA, Latvia

Craig Farndale May 2, 2012 at 2:49 am

This blog has become one of my mandatory reads every morning, lunch hour, and night. I have to stop myself getting lost in the treasure trove of information you are able to so effortlessly dig up.
Great stuff, great work. Thank you!

- Craig

Archie Murphy April 22, 2012 at 10:45 am

Martin, you have done a very good service in recording this history such that one can more closely experience the dire straits of these times.
Most books etc. tend to avoid the horrible aspects of war, even in some case glorify it.
It only due to the tremendous bravery and suffering of many individuals that the free world survived.
I have been fortunate in meeting some of these people in my life, just ordinary people who responded without expectation of any reward.

Layla March 30, 2012 at 9:10 pm

this blog is really interesting! please do keep it up. :)

however, I would like to read something about battles that are in Asia. a lot has happened there too. coming from Asia, from the Philippines in particular, I would like to trace history and am interested to know what happened during that time. thank you! :)

Ed Foster March 30, 2012 at 4:00 pm

I wanted to take a moment to express my deep appreciation of this blog/website. WWII, for a variety of reasons, has always been a deep passion of mine. I find this site to be, in a word, simply superb. Keep up the great work and rest assured, it is noticed.

Sincerely,
Ed Foster

James K March 10, 2012 at 4:14 am

Martin,
You have done SUCH an amazing job with this site. I can’t imagine the work that’s gone into finding, editing, organizing and displaying the content for this incredible project. I especially appreciate the no-nonsense, straightforward tone of the excerpts. It brings home the reality of the war in a way that hollywood or sensational fiction have failed to do. I feel very lucky to have found your site. It is a treasure. Thank you!

Craig Booth March 4, 2012 at 12:03 am

This blog along with the Facebook and Twitter feeds is just absolutely fantastic. I log on every day to see what has happened in the war! Thank you for this great site and the effort you’ve put into it.

S A M Hudson February 28, 2012 at 5:45 pm

World War II Today gives excellent coverage of key events across all theatres of war. As March begins, the war in Malta now enters its most critical phase, and the Island becomes the most bombed place on earth. For a more detailed look at the siege, maltagc70.com follows events hourly ‘on this day’, from official wartime documents including War Diaries, and personal memoirs.

James Bell February 21, 2012 at 2:33 pm

Just wanted to thank you for this site. It is an important and unique representation of the war, and I find myself checking it everyday. Great job, and thanks again.

John Vaughan February 16, 2012 at 8:54 pm

Martin,

I’m almost lost for words – such an ambitious project, I’ve followed it for a while now and never once have I been disappointed in the daily ‘show’. Your choice of topics, combined with the extremely clean and professional layout of the site, has made this one of my daily stops. I’ve added a permanent link to my ‘Kent & Sussex History Boards’ at http://www.sussexhistoryforum.co.uk, so keen am I to spread the word about this fantastic resource of yours.

How on earth do you devote so much time to the project? However you do it, you have my undying gratitude for providing such an amazing resource for those of us with a keen interest in WWII. Keep up the good work, it is appreciated!

John

Lloyd Dickinson February 7, 2012 at 3:01 am

Glad to see a nice picture of HMS Argus. My dad served on her during the Malta and Russian convoys and with Force H..

Len Falkiner January 20, 2012 at 12:43 am

So many interesting and diverse stories! I enjoy reading the personal accounts and look forward to learning more about the war with each day’s story.

Fred Henderson January 17, 2012 at 10:44 pm

Very interesting – just stumbled upon it. Thank you for the effort. I was born in
November 1945. Those that served our country literally saved the world. They
cannot be honored too much. Those were terrible times but the spirit of cooperation
and patriotism were magnificent.

Connor Curlewis January 4, 2012 at 9:15 pm

Brilliant blog, wonderful in every aspect, you can easily loose yourself in the dramatic days of World War Two, looking at it from all sides, without prejudice.

All in all great to read and good for you to read.
Long may it continue!

Kevin January 2, 2012 at 4:56 pm

Nice site. Love the sub pic on the front page.

john goodchild January 1, 2012 at 4:47 pm

Just fantastic to see the recapture of events and facts that have been forgotten or
distorted over time.
Wonderful work!!!

Sergijuus Stonis December 29, 2011 at 2:25 pm

Thanks from Russia. I really love your site, there are lot of interesting information about World War II. I learn History of XX century, and your articles on this web site is very important for me.
Best regards.

Rob Rooker December 11, 2011 at 10:58 am

Well Done Martin, keep up the good work….
Rob

Jim November 21, 2011 at 8:57 pm

Well done – nice website! One comment – on the page http://ww2today.com/further-anti-jewish-bureaucratic-measures, the significance of the “including Jewish shops” is that their Sabbath is Saturday and they therefore closed on Saturdays and, I assume, opened on Sundays.

Robert Alfred Gagnon November 11, 2011 at 4:10 am

This web site is a real revelation for me along with @realtimewwII.

I was a 4 year old living with my parents in Paris in April 1939. I and my birth family were all British subjects. My parents never told me very much about our stay in France which ended when we boarded an RN ship in Bayonne, France on or about June 23, 1940.

We eventually made our way back to Canada by July 13, 1940. About 10 years ago I began exploring Internet archives about France in 1939 and 1940. So I will no doubt find lots of useful information at this web site.

Maxwell Shaw November 7, 2011 at 1:15 pm

Sir,

I run a virtual WWII flight simulation squadron called Doolittle Raiders. We specialize in flying historic missions and have been flying them chronologically. We are currently flying missions in March 1944. One of the reason we fly historic missions is to honor the men and women who sacrificed and served during World War II to preserve democracy and defeat the forces of fascism. In that spirit it is important to remember that the pilots and crew of the aircraft we fly were real and human. Remembering their story is as important as anything we do to entertain ourselves with our virtual flying hobby.

As such, I have placed you website on a permanent link on our website at http://www.doolittleraiders.us. Your entries help us to stay focused on the human reality of the war we fly. Thank you sir and from us, a smart ‘salute.’

Very respectfully,

Maxwell Shaw
Doolittle Raiders
[Wichita Kansas, USA]

Charlie Herbek September 26, 2011 at 11:25 pm

Martin,
This page should be read every day, in every American history classroom. A clear reminder of the meaning of “mortal danger” which we seem to have grown immune to the signs of that surround us clearly each day although from a different but just as dangerous enemy.

The piece from Willey Reese’s ” A Stranger to Myself” is superb

David Stevens September 26, 2011 at 6:01 pm

Bravo! The method that you are using to tell this story brings to light the personal horrors and tragedies that so often are overshadowed by the generalized “world view” of history. This second “War to End All Wars” was not only about nations or ideologies. Truly, it was a very personal experience for millions of people. The effect it had on humanity, the hard and horrific lessons that were learned, can not be forgotten. Sites such as yours will bring that humanity back to the surface and will bear the torch of that lesson for generations to come. Again, bravo and keep up the good work!

Alistair Birch September 12, 2011 at 7:53 pm

Martin, I’ve _so_ enjoyed reading your blog – it’s wonderfully entertaining and enlightening read – and comes so much more alive so due to its day-by-day chronological nature. Do keep up the great work : )
Al

David Vernon August 31, 2011 at 9:48 pm

Martin,
This is a wonderful site. It brings alive the terrible events of seventy years ago. I am editing several personal memoirs of those who were there and as their recollections are so specific one doesn’t get a sense of what is going on more broadly. This website provides a ‘feeling’ of what was going on all over the world at the time. Congratulations and thank you very much.

David
Writer and Editor

Maxwell Troop August 26, 2011 at 1:26 pm

I just wanted to take the opportunity to say how much I enjoy this blog. As an avid reader of WWII literature and a former history minor at my college I relish any opportunity to learn. You do a great job of balancing facts with personal accounts allowing for a great perception of these war-time occurences.

Thank you! Keep them coming!

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