Jun

16

1940

Civilians continue to flee the War

French refugees flee

Half conscious, but curiously alert to danger, I flung myself into ditches all through the day. It is impossible to judge the trajectory of machine-gun bullets striking from the air; sometimes when the aircraft seemed overhead they went wide, sometimes inexplicably close and once, I felt them thudding into the earth a few inches from my head.

Jun

15

1940

The RAF bomb Italy

A high level RAF aerial reconnaissance flight photograph of Genoa taken June 1940.

On the 15th/16th June eight Wellingtons were despatched from aerodromes in Southern France to bomb Genoa. Heavy local thunderstorms were encountered and only one aircraft bombed the target; several hits were registered.

Jun

14

1940

The Germans enter Paris – Americans diplomats remain

This famous photograph from the United States National Archives is dated 14th June 1940 and often used to illustrate the fall of Paris - he is apparently watching the German troops march in.

It is argued that the woman next to the man is clapping, which would be consistent with support for those that the crowd is viewing, rather than welcoming the invaders. Others attribute it to when French troops left Marseille in 1941. Others maintain the film was taken on 14th June in Paris.
Remarkably, given the huge publicity that the image has received, no-one appears to have identified the man or those around him.

Jun

13

1945

Okinawa – mounting U.S. casualties on Kunishi Ridge

Men of the 1st Marine Division on Wana Ridge with Browning Automatic Rifle.

Some of our riflemen moved eastward along the ridge, while others moved up the slopes. We still didn’t set up our mortars: it was strictly a riflemen’s fight. We mortarmen stood by to act as stretcher bearers or riflemen. Snipers were all over the ridge and almost impossible to locate. Men began getting shot one right after another, and the stretcher teams kept on the run. We brought the casualties down to the base of the ridge, to a point where tanks could back in out of the view of snipers on the ridge crest.

Jun

13

1940

New fronts opened as Italy joins the War

German propaganda in France sought to blame the British for the war.

Extracts from the Naval, Military and Air Resume for the week up to 13th June 1940 as reported to the War Cabinet: NAYAL SITUATION. General Review. ITALY entered the war against us at midnight 10th-11th June. The evacuation of Narvik has been completed and the bulk of the forces have now reached the United Kingdom. […]

Jun

12

1940

51st Division surrender at St Valery-en-Caux

Rommel and Fortune at St. Valery

As St Valery was a picking up point for the wounded, a lifeboat was stationed there. This was brought into action to ferry the wounded out of the harbour in spite of the fact that no hospital ship was stationed outside the harbour. A brisk fire fight was now taking place across the harbour and a German machine gunner made the lifeboat his target. A row of bullet holes appeared on the side of the boat and it drifted away – the rowers, being wounded, were no longer able to manoeuvre the boat.

Jun

11

1940

RAF bomber crew find welcome in gloomy France

Bristol Blenheim Mk IV L4842 being flown by test pilot Bill Pegg near Filton, 29 May 1939. The aircraft served with No. 53 Squadron and was shot down on 17 May 1940 over France.

We were nonplussed by being asked if we thought our government would seek peace terms from Hitler when we were on our own. Our obvious astonishment at such an idea caused general laughter, but, when we were asked penetrating questions about how we thought we would beat the Germans, even if we succeeded in preventing them from over-running us, we found ourselves giving vague, broad—brush answers. In truth, we had no idea.

Jun

11

1940

The Desert War begins with British raid

British troops camped in the Egyptian desert in 1940

General Sir Archibald Wavell, Commander-in-Chief, Middle East Command, led 82,775 men from the United Kingdom, India, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and Britain’s African colonies. They faced 415,000 Italian troops stationed in Libya and East Africa. Nevertheless, it was British forces that took the initiative on the night of 11-12 June 1940, when units of the newly arrived 7th Armoured Division crossed the Libyan border and took the first Italian prisoners.

Jun

10

1940

Italy declares war on Britain and France

Hitler and Mussolini at an earlier joint parade

I only need a few thousand dead so that I can sit at the peace conference as a man who has fought.

Jun

9

1940

Churchill prophetic as Germans reach the Seine

Erwin Rommel commanded 7th Panzer Division during the invasion of France. They were frequently far in advance of the rest of the German Army and earnt the nickname the "Ghost Division" because their exact location was often unknown.

The French Army put up a fierce resistance along the Seine and had some notable successes against the invading forces. Ultimately they had no answer to the German Blitzkrieg tactics which saw deep penetrating manoeuvres by the Panzers, which outflanked their defensive positions. Rommel was to lead his Division in a hundred kilometre drive forward in just two days.