Jun

6

1944

0830: Lt Dick Winters leads Easy Company into battle


6 June 1944: 0830: Lt Dick Winters leads Easy Company into battle

Next, I divided the group into two units. One went with Lt. Compton, the other with myself. He took one hedge, I another. When we reach the hedge that led up to our position, we stopped. Here I placed another machine gunner facing on the 88 that was pointing straight at us, with instructions not to fire unless he saw a definite target, so he wouldn’t give his position away for he was without cover from the gun.

Jun

6

1944

0810: Sergeant Lomell finds the Pointe du Hoc guns


6th June 1944:0810: Sergeant Lomell finds the Pointe du Hoc guns

By the time we fought our way about a mile or so to the blacktopped coastal road (about one hour), I had only a dozen men left, some of whom were lightly wounded, but able to fight on. Ten of the original 22 Rangers in my boat team had been killed or were very badly wounded. We still had not found the guns nor had a ny idea of where they were.

Jun

6

1944

0800: Green Howards land on Gold Beach


6th June 1944: 0800: Green Howards land on Gold Beach

Cairns hit in leg. Stopped a few minutes at edge of beach. Woods hit in eye. Got on to coast road where things were unpleasant owing to mortars and shells flying around and minefield on both sides. Some logs on the side of the road provided welcome protection.

Jun

6

1944

0745: Heavy seas prevent DD tanks launching


6th June 1944: 0745: Heavy seas prevent DD tanks launching

Signals were exchanged: the minesweepers had completed their task and were wishing us Godspeed on our mission. The flotilla of LCTs began maneuvering for launching our DD tanks. This meant it was necessary for them to head into the wind, showing a broadside to the enemy supposedly alert on the coast.

Jun

6

1944

0737: Cruiser HMS Scylla off Sword beach


6 June 1944: 0737: Cruiser HMS Scylla off Sword beach

It is now 0730 and so far we have heard nothing from jerry except a report of E Boats on our port side at 0645. Perhaps it is due to our fighter umbrella which I believe are continuously up in strength of 9 squadrons and with Rocket Typhoons flying over should be a pretty formidable force to oppose jerry.

Jun

6

1944

0710: US Rangers 2nd Battalion assault Pointe du Hoc


6 June 1944: 0710: US Rangers 2nd Battalion assault Point du Hoc

Carrying a boat team of Company E, commanded by 1st Lt. Theodore E. Lapres, Jr., this craft grounded about 25 yards from the bottom of the cliff. Three or four Germans were standing on the cliff edge, shooting down at the craft. Rangers near the stern took these enemy under fire and drove them out of sight.

Jun

6

1944

0700: Utah beach assault sustained


6 June 1944: 0700: Utah beach assault sustained

He repeatedly led groups from the beach, over the seawall and established them inland. His valor, courage, and presence in the very front of the attack and his complete unconcern at being under heavy fire inspired the troops to heights of enthusiasm and self-sacrifice.

Jun

6

1944

0700: Robert Capa captures Huston Riley in the surf


6 June 1944: 0700: Robert Capa captures Huston Riley in the surf

When he activated his Navy M-26 belt life preservers and floated to the surface, Riley became a target for the guns and artillery shells mowing down his comrades. Struck several times, the 22-year-old soldier took about half an hour to reach the Normandy shore. Capa took this photo of him in the surf and then with the assistance of a sergeant helped Riley, who later recalled thinking, “What the hell is this guy doing here? I can’t believe it. Here’s a cameraman on the shore.

Jun

6

1944

0645: The final run in to Omaha beach


6 June 1944: 0645: The final run in to Omaha beach

As we approached the beach the ramp was lowered. Mortar and artillery shells exploded on land and in the water. Unseen snipers concealed in the cliffs were shooting down at individuals, causing screams from those being hit. The water was turning red from the blood. The noise from artillery fire, the rapid-fire rattle from nearby MG-42s, and naval gunfire was deafening. The smell of cordite was something that would forever become fixed in our minds, always associated with death and destruction.

Jun

6

1944

0630: Utah beach landings begin


6th June 1944: 0630: Utah beach landings begin

We kept moving as fast as possible. Some enemy rifleman began firing at me, so I picked myself up and began to run forward over the top of the dunes. Facing me were five of the enemy. I shot the one with his hand raised to hurl a grenade. The rest threw down their rifles and put up their hands.