bombing

Oct

17

1942

Operation Robinson hits Le Creusot works

17th October 1942: Operation Robinson hits Le Creusot works

Soon the sight was re-aligned. Gerry opened the bomb-doors and the bombing run was on. I looked out of the starboard blister. Opposition from the ground was negligible certainly nothing came our way. Gerry held the Lancaster level and steady at the indicated airspeed required. ‘Bombs gonel’ came confidently from the nose of the aircraft.

Oct

13

1942

British War Cabinet monitors German morale

13th October 1942: British War Cabinet monitors German morale

” Hamburg is unrecognisable. It looks as if an earthquake has taken place.” ” Very soon there won’t be even ruins in our Duisburg.” ” If the Tommies keep on bombing us like this Western Germany will soon cease to exist.” ” I cannot understand what you are doing at the front that we should be bombed four nights in succession.”

Sep

29

1942

Lone bomber hits Petworth School – 32 dead

29th September 1942: Lone bomber hits Petworth School – 32 dead

There has been no damage of national importance. The more outstanding incidents were at Hastings on the 24th, when 19 people were killed and 17 seriously injured, and at Petworth (Sussex) on the 29th, where a boys’ school was completely wrecked; casualties are reported to be 23 killed, of whom 20 are children, and 30 seriously injured, of whom 24 are children. It is feared that 7 children are still missing and must be presumed dead.

Sep

10

1942

Bomber Command target Dusseldorf

10th September 1942: Bomber Command target Dusseldorf

Among them were six factories making steel products or machinery, two factories making steel tubes, one making machine tools and magnetic mines, two chemical works and many other factories producing a variety of commodities such as enamel, paper, boilers, wire, insulating materials, railway wagons and harvesting machinery.

Aug

28

1942

‘Nuisance raid’ on Bristol kills 44

28th August 42: ‘Nuisance raid’ on Bristol kills 44

When I walked past the three buses, I heard the sound of a single-engine aircraft far above in the clear blue sky — it was a lovely summer’s day then. It never crossed my mind that it was an enemy plane; it had been eighteen months since the last major German air-raid on Bristol. Yet the lone raider was from the Luftwaffe; maybe returning from a raid in the North with one bomb left, which he decided to jettison before homing to his base airfield.

Aug

23

1942

Black Sunday in Stalingrad

23rd August 1942: Black Sunday in Stalingrad

After ten minutes the sun was blocked out; everything was covered in smoke and dust. The ground beneath my feet was shaking. There was a continuous roaring on all sides, and fragments of bombs and broken stone were falling from the sky. It went on like this until darkness fell. The voice from the 1oud~speaker was still saying: ‘Citizens, the air-raid warning is still in effect!’

Jul

21

1942

Churchill: “severe, ruthless bombing of Germany” needed


21st July 1942: Churchill: severe, ruthless bombing of Germany needed

We must regard the Bomber offensive against Germany at least as a feature in breaking her war-will, second only to the largest military operations which can be conducted on the Continent until that war-will is broken. Renewed, intense efforts should be made by the Allies to develop during the winter and onwards ever-growing, ever more accurate and ever more far-ranging Bomber attacks on Germany.

Jun

25

1942

Third thousand bomber raid hits Bremen

25th June 1942: Third thousand bomber raid hits Bremen

On the first of these nights (25th-26th June), 1,105 aircraft drawn from Bomber, Fighter, Coastal and Army Co-operation Commands were despatched. While the main attack was in progress against Bremen, a part of this force attacked aerodromes in Germany and occupied territory.

Jun

22

1942

Luftwaffe upgrades Reich air defence system

In front of this map there is another raised platform, equipped with a complicated arrangement of microphones and switches. From here every single fighter formation can be directed by ground-control officers individually by ultra-short-wave radio telephone. A glance at the map is all that is required to obtain a complete picture of the changing situation at any given moment.

May

10

1942

The reality of Home Guard life in Britain

10th May 1942: The reality of Home Guard life in Britain

A few soldiers had got out of the ruins only slightly hurt. The first to be brought out was young John Nicholls, 19, a young Home Guard in Trice’s old section. He had only just received his papers for joining the Army, and was not on parade. He died soon after. The next was young Dray, brother of a Home Guard, very badly hurt. Then Old Hardinge, ex-soldier and Home Guard over 65. He could walk supported, but was very badly scalded.