134,000 troops now saved by Dunkirk evacuation

British troops during the evacuation from Dunkirk, 1940.

On the 29th a number of merchant seamen at Dover refused to take their ships to sea for the evacuation and were replaced by Naval ratings from Chatham. By midnight on the 30th/31st 134,000 troops had been landed. Evacuation is still proceeding. Up to the present 222 warships and 665 other ships have been employed in this operation. Twelve Naval officers and a number of ratings have been sent as a ” beach party ” to Dunkirk, and about 130 small ships, requisitioned from the French, are being sent to Dover…




Royal Navy submarine HMS Seal is captured

HMS Seal showing battle damage

Two ratings just managed to escape from the flooded rear compartments before the watertight doors were sealed. The seriously damaged submarine now lay with her aft end wedged in the mud unable to surface, despite frantic efforts from the crew. After nearly 24 hours submerged the whole crew were seriously affected by lack of oxygen and some were nearly comatose.




First Civilian Deaths in England

The ARP and police were to stand on a large 'water tank' during their rescue of casualties in Victoria Road, Clacton.

Frederick Gill and his wife Dorothy became the first civilian fatal casualties of the war in England, when a Heinkel bomber crash landed on their house, No. 25 Victoriia Road, Clacton. Moments later there was an enormous explosion. The plane had been circling over Clacton in Essex for about half an hour before it came down, and many people looking out of the windows were injured in the blast.




First German air raid on UK

Aerial view of HMS Southampton being bombed near the Forth Bridge

‘Almost simultaneously there was a giant waterspout as high as the bridge alongside one of the capital ships and a barge tied up alongside; it seemed to fly up in the air! In later life I discovered it was HMS Southampton.’