Victoria Cross

Aug

18

1944

Currie leads epic Canadian attack at Lambert sur Dive


18 August 1944: Currie leads epic Canadian attack at Lambert sur Dive

Since all the officers under his command were either killed or wounded during the action, Major Currie had virtually no respite from his duties and in fact obtained only one hour’s sleep during the entire period. Nevertheless he did not permit his fatigue to become apparent to his troops and throughout the action took every opportunity to visit weapon pits and other defensive posts to talk to his men, to advise them as to the best use of their weapons and to cheer them with words of encouragement.

Aug

16

1944

Tasker Watkins – First Welsh VC of the war


16 August 1944: Tasker Watkins – First Welsh VC of the war

Lieutenant Watkin’s company now had only some 30 men left and was counterattacked by 50 enemy infantry. Lieutenant Watkins directed the fire of his men and then led a bayonet charge, which resulted in the almost complete destruction of the enemy. It was now dusk and orders were given for the battalion to withdraw. These orders were not received by Lieutenant Watkin’s company as the wireless set had been destroyed.

Aug

8

1944

A tank attack into the bocage

During this period Captain Jamieson was wounded in the right eye and left forearm but when his wounds were dressed he refused to be evacuated. By this time all the other officers had become casualties so Captain Jamieson reorganised his Company, regardless of personal safety, walking amongst his men in full view of the enemy, as there was no cover. After several hours of bitter and confused fighting, the last Germans were driven from the Company position.

Aug

6

1944

US breakout continues, British locked in combat


6 August 1944: US breakout continues, British locked in combat

Three times in the last few days, in as many tents and wooded fields, the same dialogue with minor variations: Division commander: ‘But my flanks, General?’ The General: ‘You have nothing to worry about. If anything develops – and it won’t – our tactical Air will know before you do, and will clobber it. That will give me plenty of time to pull something out of the hat.’

Aug

4

1944

Canadian Lancaster pilot dies trying to save crew


4 August 1944: Canadian Lancaster pilot dies trying to save crew

As the deputy master bomber had already been shot down, the success of the attack depended on Squadron-Leader Bazalgette and this he knew. Despite the appalling conditions in his burning aircraft, he pressed on gallantly to the target, marking and bombing it accurately. That the attack was successful was due to his magnificent effort

Jun

23

1944

Two VCs in one day for ‘British’ soldiers


23 June 1944: Two VCs in one day for ‘British’ soldiers

Despite these overwhelming odds, he reached the Red House and closed with the Japanese occupants. He killed three and put five more to flight and captured two light machine guns and much ammunition. He then gave accurate supporting fire from the bunker to the remainder of his platoon which enabled them to reach their objective.

Jun

6

1944

1000: Stanley Hollis wins only D-Day VC


6th June 1944: 1000: Stanley Hollis wins only D-Day VC

Wherever the lighting was heaviest CSM Hollis appeared and, in the course of a magnificent day’s work, he displayed the utmost gallantry and on two separate occasions his courage and initiative prevented the enemy from holdng up the advance at critical stages.

Jun

3

1944

Posthumous VC following single handed attack


3 June 1944: Posthumous VC following single handed attack

Inspired by the example of Sergeant Rogers, the Platoon breached the enemy’s wire and began the assault. Still alone and penetrating deeper into the enemy position, Sergeant Rogers, whilst attempting to silence a third machine-gun post, was blown off his feet by a grenade which burst beside him and wounded him in the leg.

May

24

1944

Canadian infantry hold bridgehead against Panzers


24 May 1944: Canadian infantry hold bridgehead against Panzer attack

Early in the action, Major Mahony was wounded in the head and twice in the leg, but he refused medical aid and continued to direct the defence of the bridgehead, despite the fact that movement of any kind caused him extreme pain. It was only when the remaining Companies of the Regiment had crossed the river to support him that he allowed his wounds to be dressed and even then refused to be evacuated, staying instead with his Company.

May

12

1944

Single handed attack overcomes German position


12 May 1944: Single handed attack overcomes German position

Volunteering at once and crawling forward through the wire to a flank, Sepoy Kamal Ram attacked the post single handed and shot the first machine-gunner; a second German tried to seize his weapon but Sepoy Kamal Ram killed him with the bayonet, and then shot a German officer who, appearing from the trench with his pistol, was about to fire.